The Bible as Literature

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Summary

Some people have to work two jobs or more to make ends meet. They can’t afford childcare or healthcare. Each day, they battle the same frustrations and emotions that each of us carry inside, with the added misery of poverty and disadvantage.

The working poor live among us, hidden in plain sight. Yet, those of us who have time to read the New York Times, to browse the web, or listen to podcasts—those of us with time and access—often complain that we don’t have time. This complaint echoes the cry of the disciples in Matthew, who repeatedly beg Jesus to send the needy away.

The Syrophoenician woman in Matthew is Lord’s answer to this complaint. Like that of the disciples, her cry is persistent, but it reflects a different kind of thinking, one born out of need.

“If I were rich man,” the famed Tevya exclaimed, “I would discuss the holy books with learned men seven hours every day. That would be the sweetest thing of all.” (Fiddler on the Roof)

Richard and Fr. Marc discuss Matthew 15:21-28.

Episode 317 Matthew 15:21-28; Music from: “Jewish Blues” by The Art of Seven (jamendo.com) License: CC BY (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Show Notes

Some people have to work two jobs or more to make ends meet. They can’t afford childcare or healthcare. Each day, they battle the same frustrations and emotions that each of us carry inside, with the added misery of poverty and disadvantage. 

The working poor live among us, hidden in plain sight. Yet, those of us who have time to read the New York Times, to browse the web, or listen to podcasts—those of us with time and access—often complain that we don’t have time. This complaint echoes the cry of the disciples in Matthew, who repeatedly beg Jesus to send the needy away. 

The Syrophoenician woman in Matthew is Lord’s answer to this complaint. Like that of the disciples, her cry is persistent, but it reflects a different kind of thinking, one born out of need. 

“If I were rich man,” the famed Tevya exclaimed, “I would discuss the holy books with learned men seven hours every day. That would be the sweetest thing of all.” (Fiddler on the Roof) 

Richard and Fr. Marc discuss Matthew 15:21-28. 

Episode 317 Matthew 15:21-28; Music from: “Jewish Blues” by The Art of Seven (jamendo.com) License: CC BY (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

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What is The Bible as Literature?

Each week, Dr. Richard Benton, Fr. Marc Boulos and guests discuss the content of the Bible as literature. On Tuesdays, Fr. Paul Tarazi presents an in-depth analysis of the biblical text in the original languages.