Be with the Word

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Summary

In this week's episode, Dr. Gerry and Dr. Peter discuss how forgiving is good for you. They also explain the difference between decisional and emotional forgiveness, the difference between forgiveness and reconciliation, and the role that mercy plays to elevate human forgiveness to a supernatural level.

Show Notes

Overall Takeaways

Forgiving is good for you. However, it's important to understand the difference between decisional and emotional forgiveness, the difference between forgiveness and reconciliation, and the role that mercy plays to elevate human forgiveness to a supernatural level.


Key Verses from Sunday Mass Readings

"Let the house of Israel say,
'His mercy endures forever.'
Let the house of Aaron say,
'His mercy endures forever.'
Let those who fear the LORD say,
'His mercy endures forever.'"

"Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
who in his great mercy gave us a new birth to a living hope
through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead,
to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading,
kept in heaven for you."

“Receive the Holy Spirit.
Whose sins you forgive are forgiven them,
and whose sins you retain are retained.”


Where Catholicism Meets Psychology

Decisional forgiveness is an act of the intellect and the will. Emotional forgiveness is the following of the heart. The first is a decision to be made; it can take years or even decades for the latter to follow.

Forgiveness does not justify or condone the sinful act that occurred. Instead, it is a choice that is made to free yourself from harboring anger.

Forgiveness is a gift that you can offer. The receiving or accepting that gift by the other person is a separate component, which may not occur or may take longer to happen. If the gift of forgiveness is given and received, you achieve reconciliation.

Dr. Gerry cites several interesting psychological studies as well as a story of heroic forgiveness from the New York Times in this week's episode. Many studies find that the act of forgiving contributes to better emotional and physical health.

Dr. Peter reminds us that forgiveness occurs at the human, natural level. God's mercy is the infusion of grace, propelling forgiveness into the supernatural realm.


Action Plan for the Week

Identify something small that your spouse, child, or close friend does repeatedly that annoys you. Let go of the resentment or frustration, and make a decision to empathize with what they are doing and why they are doing it. Commit to forgiveness and observe what happens inside yourself.

What is Be with the Word?

“Be With The Word” is a weekly podcast from Souls and Hearts with Dr. Peter Malinoski, clinical psychologist, and Dr. Gerry Crete, marriage and family therapist. The hosts delve into human and psychological issues that surface in the upcoming Sunday Mass readings.