The Bible as Literature

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Summary

In a society that consumerizes rebellion against parents both as entertainment and an axiom of pop-psychology, the basic premise of the New Testament—that the Son is disempowered because all glory and all power belong to his Father—is practically impossible to accept.

In Matthew, when Jesus praises his Father, in the very content of his prayer, he underscores that his God is the Lord both of the heavens and the earth, a span that imposes total dominion, stripping Jesus, and therefore, all human beings of power, in fulfillment of the prophecy of Isaiah.

Still, in language reminiscent of 1 Corinthians, in Matthew 11, we hear that all things are handed over to Jesus—but what does that power look like? What is the power that Jesus brought to Chorazin and Bethsaida if the outcome of his life is abject failure and defeat? How is this an easy yolk?

Richard and Fr. Marc discuss the Matthew 11:25-30.

Episode 290 Matthew 11:25-30 Subscribe: feedpress.me/the-bible-as-literature; Music from https://filmmusic.io: “Modern Jazz Samba” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Show Notes

In a society that consumerizes rebellion against parents both as entertainment and an axiom of pop-psychology, the basic premise of the New Testament—that the Son is disempowered because all glory and all power belong to his Father—is practically impossible to accept. 

In Matthew, when Jesus praises his Father, in the very content of his prayer, he underscores that his God is the Lord both of the heavens and the earth, a span that imposes total dominion, stripping Jesus, and therefore, all human beings of power, in fulfillment of the prophecy of Isaiah. 

Still, in language reminiscent of 1 Corinthians, in Matthew 11, we hear that all things are handed over to Jesus—but what does that power look like? What is the power that Jesus brought to Chorazin and Bethsaida if the outcome of his life is abject failure and defeat? How is this an easy yolk? 

Richard and Fr. Marc discuss the Matthew 11:25-30.

Episode 290 Matthew 11:25-30 Subscribe: feedpress.me/the-bible-as-literature; Music from https://filmmusic.io: “Modern Jazz Samba” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

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What is The Bible as Literature?

Each week, Dr. Richard Benton, Fr. Marc Boulos and guests discuss the content of the Bible as literature. On Tuesdays, Fr. Paul Tarazi presents an in-depth analysis of the biblical text in the original languages.