Putting It Together

{{ show.title }}Trailer Bonus Episode {{ selectedEpisode.number }}
{{ selectedEpisode.title }}
|
{{ displaySpeed }}x
{{ selectedEpisode.title }}
By {{ selectedEpisode.author }}
Broadcast by

Summary

Isaac Bernier-Doyle dials in from London, England to discuss why the song "America" from West Side Story may be more relevant today than when it was originally written. This song shows off Anita's temper and verbal mastery. The rest of the characters try to match wits as best they can.

Show Notes

Isaac Bernier-Doyle dials in from London, England to discuss why the song "America" from West Side Story may be more relevant today than when it was originally written. This song shows off Anita's temper and verbal mastery. The rest of the characters try to match wits as best they can.

Isaac Bernier-Doyle is the co-host of That's a Shame: https://shame.city

Bill Murray being weird on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert: https://bit.ly/2Iemvgh

How you can help support Puerto Rico: https://on-ajc.com/2NELzDb

Putting It Together is a proud member of The Alberta Podcast Network, powered by ATB. You can find all the great shows by going here: https://www.albertapodcastnetwork.com

Recorded at Media Lab YYC. Media Lab is a public production studio located in downtown Calgary, Alberta. They help you tell your story. They do this by assisting in the creation of videos and podcasts. Find more information at: http://medialabyyc.com

Keep up to date with Putting It Together by following Kyle on his social media channels.
Twitter: https://twitter.com/thekylemarshall
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thekylemarshall/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thekylemarshall/

★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

What is Putting It Together?

This is a podcast about Stephen Sondheim's entire body of work show by show and song by song. Each week Kyle Marshall invites an expert to discuss a Sondheim song in-depth. Together they discover the humour, how the songs inform character, and any hidden meanings. Most importantly they try to understand the man behind the music, the Shakespeare of our time, as best they can.