The Bible as Literature

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Summary

In the New Testament, the proclamation of the death of Christ is inextricably bound to the proclamation of his Resurrection. Typical explanations of this link cheapen it by expounding on the psychology of hope, as if the Resurrection is proclaimed as an antidote for the emotional burden of the Cross. On the contrary, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep, is a biblical sign of the coming Kingdom, in which God will hold each of us to account for the Crucifixion. You better believe they’re linked.

Richard and Fr. Marc discuss Matthew 16:24-28.

Episode 325 Matthew 16:24-28; Music: Dead Drop by Kevin MacLeod
Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3624-dead-drop
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Show Notes

In the New Testament, the proclamation of the death of Christ is inextricably bound to the proclamation of his Resurrection. Typical explanations of this link cheapen it by expounding on the psychology of hope, as if the Resurrection is proclaimed as an antidote for the emotional burden of the Cross. On the contrary, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep, is a biblical sign of the coming Kingdom, in which God will hold each of us to account for the Crucifixion. You better believe they’re linked. 

Richard and Fr. Marc discuss Matthew 16:24-28.

Episode 325 Matthew 16:24-28; Music: Dead Drop by Kevin MacLeod
Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3624-dead-drop
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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What is The Bible as Literature?

Each week, Dr. Richard Benton, Fr. Marc Boulos and guests discuss the content of the Bible as literature. On Tuesdays, Fr. Paul Tarazi presents an in-depth analysis of the biblical text in the original languages.