Trek In Time

Matt and Sean talk about what remains when the daily details are stripped away. There’s some great storytelling in this episode of Star Trek Enterprise, which really leaves a mark on the viewer.

Show Notes

https://youtu.be/J7MQ983sjUo

Matt and Sean talk about what remains when the daily details are stripped away. There’s some great storytelling in this episode of Star Trek Enterprise, which really leaves a mark on the viewer. 

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What is Trek In Time?

Join Sean and Matt as they rewatch all of Star Trek in order and in historical context.

Before we get started shortly after Sean and I recorded this episode of Trek and time, the news came out that Michelle Nichols had died at the age of 89. And it goes without saying that we're deeply saddened by her loss. And she didn't just break ground as one of the first prominent black women on television, but she was an inspiration for a generation.

And on a personal note, I had a chance to meet her about a decade ago at a NASA event. And she was as welcoming and kind as you can imagine. And also pretty funny, she's gonna be missed now, back to the show

in this episode of Trek in time, we're gonna talk about characters, playing out the roles without any of the details, getting in the way. That's right. We're talking about enterprise episode eight of season three, Twilight, which dropped on November 5th, 2003. Welcome to Trek in time where we're watching every episode of star Trek in chronological order and in history.

We're going into a deep dive on the episodes in the order, which the story takes place. And we're also taking a look at the history of the times when the episodes originally aired. So we're still in early days, we're still in enterprise and we are therefore in 2003. And who are we? Well, I'm Sean Ferrell.

I'm a writer. I read some sci-fi. I read some stuff for kids and with me as my brother, Matt, Matt is the guru and inquisitor behind the YouTube channel undecided with Matt Ferrell, which takes a look at merging tech and it's impact on our lives. And it's just recently passed 1 million subscribers.

Congratulations, Matt, how are you doing today? I'm

thank you very much. I'm doing pretty well. How about yourself?

I'm doing okay. Looking forward to talking about this episode in particular, which I spoiler really enjoyed. Get that out of the way. So mm-hmm, Matt as usual. We like to start with some viewer comments from previous episodes.

So I'll give you an opportunity to share some of that with us now.

Okay. So for the first comment I've we, I wanted to highlight is from AJAS Chan. He said, uh, I vote for, this is on episode 56 exile. We had asked, we were talking about like, what do we do with episodes that are, you know, messing with time.

So it's. Deep space nine, going back in time to the original series. Mm-hmm . When are we gonna watch those videos? When, what order we're we watch them. He wrote, I vote for yes, for including the movies in what we're doing. I agree with the plan to handle time travel. However, you will also need to plan for alternative timelines.

Mm-hmm not sure if this is right. And he gave us an entire list of enterprise discovery, seasons one and two, then strange new world star Trek, 2009 into darkness. He gave us the entire rundown of what he thinks mm-hmm . I kind of like the way he broke it down. So I think you and I, at some point are probably gonna have to sit down and go through that list and determine if we

wanna do it that way.

That is a pretty nice list and it is pretty exhaustive too. I, I appreciate that. Uh, AJ, you're maybe stepping in as the third brother on this. By putting this together in this way, really terrific. One

of the next comments is from the puzzle maker and it was so from the same episode, uh, episode 56 of our show on exile.

Um, I have a question. What would you do if in the progress of making this podcast, a new series comes out. That is in the time period you've already covered and he wrote time travel would be a solution, I suppose, which I thought was really funny. The, yeah, the way they're coming out with shows on, uh, the CBS app, all that stuff, the way they're doing it, now, it, we are in definitely in danger of that happening because they're releasing things

all over the place.

I think it's actually highly like. That this will happen. And as a matter of fact, I had a discussion with my girlfriend this morning, where she suddenly was very concerned about this particular thing. It's very funny that you pulled this come out because she said, what are you gonna do? What are you gonna, you and Matt need to plan, what are you gonna do?

And I said, we'll cross that bridge when we come to it. But ultimately what I think we would do is reach the end of whatever cycle we happen to be. And then go back and cover the new episodes of whatever was out of order. So if a new show came out this year, that's about, uh, some of the characters on enterprise.

Taking place as a prequel to enterprise, I would argue that we would finish the enterprise cycle and then right back and fill in those gaps. And as far as the podcast is concerned, as far as the order of episodes is concerned, people can listen to the episodes of the podcast in whatever word they want.

So if somebody let's say five years from now wants to come in and listen to. All of this in the new chronological order, they could manage that on their own, in the same way we're managing, watching the episodes in chronological. Right? So, uh, it is as a puzzle maker points out it is a conundrum, but it is one that we can only manage as.

Who we are, which is we're given the episodes we've got right now, if they add more, we'll cross that bridge. When we get there, we'll incorporate things as best we can. And if that means a little bit of back and forth, or maybe even waiting for a series to be done before covering it, mm-hmm, , that's another possibility, like we've talked about strange new worlds.

It is theoretically possible that we could catch up to strange new worlds before it's done. Yep. So we would have to evaluate like, how are we gonna, how are we gonna, how are we gonna deal with that? So these are in the big scheme of things. These are good problems. They have to be worried about how are we gonna talk about star Trek?

I, I love that being the problem. Yeah. So yeah.

And the last thing I'm gonna bring up is Sean, at the end of every episode, you know, tells people to go out and write and review us. And the last one he said, if it's just going out and saying, I like these guys. Right, right. I like these guys. And we had several comments in the last episode that were just.

I like these guys. So I just wanna thank, uh, Kelly, William and robo Trav for, uh, the little, uh, little boost for us there. That's awesome. Thank you very much.

Yeah. Thank you. Thank you so much. It's nice to know that. Uh, you're not just here for the track, but maybe you're here for a little bit of us. Wink and now post that winking sound effect.

You'll notice there's another sound effect. Well, yes, that's, that's the read alert. It's time for Matt to read the Wikipedia description for this episode. And it's a great return to form for Wikipedia synopsis. So, oh boy, enjoyment. So I I'm,

I should probably strap myself in for this one. I think you should get ready.

Okay. Twilight is the eighth episode of the third season of the American science fiction television series, star Trek enterprise originally broadcast on November 5th, 2003. it was the sixties episode of the series. Overall, the episode was written by co-producer Michael Sussman and directed by former star Trek, Voyager actor, Robert Duncan McNeil.

Set in the 22nd century, the series follows the adventures of the first star fleet Starship, enterprise registration at X oh one. In this episode, following an accident, captain Jonathan archers, wait

the way this is written so weird. Yeah. It's a possessive of Scott

Bula. Yes, I captain Jonathan archers.

Scott Bula long term memory is affected and is. And he's relieved of duty. The crew of the enterprise subsequently failed to stop the DY attack on the earth, resulting in the remnants of the human race. Resettling another planet Dr. Fox John Billingsley finds a way of curing Archer in the past in the hope that it would undo everything.

Since captain Archer, since captain was originally injured.

Woo. That was a lot to read. That's a lot of stuff. Yeah. It's a little wrong on some of the details. Yeah. But ultimately, yeah, it hits all the high notes. As Matt mentioned, this was directed by Robert Duncan, McNeil Paris, Tom Paris from Voyager. Uh, not the first episode that we've seen him directive enterprise and like his cohort who played Belan Torres.

Two of them have some good directing chops. This episode, I thought had some very nice moments. It has a lot of very quiet moments which are touching, and it has some action sequences, which are, uh, especially the CGI stuff with the, uh, space battles are well, well done. And I thought it was also some very smart let's save money where we can re usage.

Of Xindi attacks within the ship. I did not mind it, even though I recognized the sequences, they were the same sequences from the last time that Xindi got aboard the ship. Look, if you're gonna use that as a shortcut, that's fine. Nobody is saying anything. People are walking through the hallway, shooting each other.

I had no problem with that. This episode aired on November 5th, 2003, and it included guest appearances by Gary Graham as ambassador Saal. Back again, after a kind of lengthy absence. We haven't seen ambassador Saal in a while. Yep. Brett Rebe as Rin cost and Richard Anthony CNA as a guard. What was the world like when this episode aired?

Well, Matt in fall, November early, November of 2003. I know what you were singing. Do you remember what you were singing? That's right. You were singing here without you by three doors down. okay.

All right.

Movie theaters, people were going to scary movie three for the second week in a row. There was a gap in episode broadcast because smartly the network was like, let's not try and compete with baseball.

so there was a gap. The last time we've talked about an episode was an episode that aired in mid-October. So there were a couple of weeks of no episodes. And in that absence, scary movie three was debuted and it helped the top spot. This is surprising to me. I never thought that these movies were this popular, but scary movie three held the top spot for two weeks in a row.

It debuted the week earlier with 48 million and it gained another 20 in week. And on television. What was the competition like? Well, it continued to be a lot like my wife and kids, and it's all relative on ABC, both of which pulled in between eight and 10 million, the country music association awards aired on CBS to 20 million viewers that 70 show and a minute was Stan Hooper, a show which I have zero recollection of both had between five and 7 million on Fox.

Ed got 9 million on NBC and Smallville pulled in 6 million on WB and star Trek enterprise. Well, it maintained what has been a pretty consistent number 4 million viewers. I have a feeling that I could just record myself saying 4 million viewers and reuse that phrase, just like they reuse the attack sequence by the Xindi in this episode.

and from the New York times I chose this headline. As a result of its being tied to de lingering ongoing questions around war questions around how do you conduct it? What do you do once you've entered into it? And what does it mean to do something like this? This is the point of this entire season of enterprise, where it is in the attempt to put.

An attack that they fear is coming. The enterprise has ventured deep into the expanse to stop the Xindi from destroying humanity. And up to this point, the season has dealt with questions of, well, is this even necessary? It has started to have a drip, drip, drip of, well, not all Xindi are like Xindi that have attacked us.

Not all Xindi are as aggressive as what we fear. Not all Xindi are the same. And that begins to chip away at the ideas of, well, do we need the even be doing this? What is it that we're doing? How do we conduct this? And I thought that this New York times article from November 5th, 2003, kind of spoke to that.

An issue for Bush, how to speak of casualties. When the Chino helicopter was shot down on Sunday in Iraq, killing 15 Americans, president Bush, let his defense secretary do the talking and stayed out of sight at his ranch. The president has not attended the funeral of any American soldiers killed in action.

White house officials say, and with violent and Baghdad dominating the headlines. This. He has used his public appearances to focus on the health of the economy and the wildfires in California. The quandary for Mr. Bush administration officials say is in finding a balance expressing sympathy for fallen soldiers, without drawing more attention to the casualties by commenting daily on every new death.

It is the legacy of the Iraq war that this is what was happening. Quote, after the cessation of hostilities, we were no longer in active combat at this point, but there was the growing insurrection element in Iraq that was continuing to push back against us occupation. And ultimately the entire reason for our going would never prove to be fruitful.

We went there to find weapons, mass destruction. Those weapons were never found. I thought it tied in nicely with the themes of the season so far. And I think this episode in particular does a very interesting thing in how it tells the story of why they're there. Right. What they're doing. It is a bit of a, I wouldn't say it's like a reset button, but it's a nice reminder.

That we've had the drip, drip, drip of like, what are we doing here? Do we actually hate all these people? Do they all actually hate us? Is this what we're like? What are we trying to accomplish here? What is our mission? And the here we have an episode which deals with a wide range of time, not as the result of time travel.

Which I'm so glad that this didn't involve time travel, but through just a telling of a long term story, as the result of captain Archer's injury, which is effectively puts him into the mode of the lead character in the movie memento, he can no longer retain. He can no longer create new long term memories.

He lives in the now permanently. And as a result, As we move forward in time. The details of what has happened in between has to be filled in to him and therefore us. And what we find out is ultimately long term, it looks like all the time travel stuff that they had in the first season, all the little sprinklings of hinting at what was important in this show, there was always the overriding theme of there's something about Archer in particular.

That is key. And this episode underscores that in a way that up to this point, they've only teased it, but at this point they finally state it in a way that you can hold onto. And I really, really like that. It's a concrete thing. It's no longer arch is important because I said Archer is important. We see a future in which Archer steps completely out of his role and what happens in small scale.

The crew loses its cohesion and what happens large scale. They do not stop the Xindi threat. In fact, the Xindi don't just stop at destroying earth. There is a OC like genocide that is humanity is pursued everywhere. It's going by the Xindi and is being eradicated. And it is while not showing. Holocaust style camps.

It's not showing prison camps. It's not showing anything that is clear, like hard destruction of humanity, but it does an amazing job of creating attention and a terror in what has been going on. And it doesn't very quietly. I really think that the storytelling in this episode is top notch. What did you think about.

No.

I agree. I think that the storytelling one, this was great. I like this episode. I was, I remembered really liking it when I originally watched it and rewatching it, I was fully engaged. The one thing I'd wanna tie back to what you brought up, the relation between the Iraq war. And this is this, do you think it's more of an allegory of star fleet having the same mentality as the Bush administration going into Iraq?

Or do you think the Federation is Iraq? Because the way that the Xindi are attacking. is basically what we did going into Iraq. Mm-hmm we think there's weapons of mass destruction. They're going to attack us. They're gonna hurt us. We're gonna be preemptive, go there and destroy everything. And that's what Thein India are doing to us.

They they've been told that the Federation is going to AATE the Xindi so they're gonna be preemptive going there and destroy all humanity to protect themselves. Right. So I would argue that the actual analogy is the Xindi are the United States. The Federation is kind of like the invaded country. Mm-hmm, fighting back against that mentality of preemptive strikes.

I think that, I think that one of the strengths of the episode is yes, I think it does have that, uh, model. I also think it has both. I think one of the strengths of the storytelling in this season is that it is saying ultimately it doesn't really matter. Who thinks they're the aggrieved party. Both think they're the agreed party.

Yeah. Both of them, depending on how this all plays out. If the Xindi storyline that's presented here were a TV show we were seeing from the other side, we'd be rooting for the Xindi yeah. And we would agree with the idea of like, yeah, you gotta stop those humans from, from getting to you. It's a matter of perspective.

It's a matter of who wins gets to write the history. And I think that that's one of the things in this episode in particular and the season at large, that it does a good job with. The idea of both sides are saying I'm scared of the. I'm scared of what they might do. Therefore I have to strike first. Both sides are saying that, so you can, you can watch it from the perspective of, oh, the Federation is like the us, and here is this other entity, which is like the, the enemy party.

Or you can flip that model. I think you can do it both ways. And ultimately it's about, yeah, maybe you should have some empathy. Maybe you should be looking at things from both sides. Maybe you should try maybe. Having that opportunity to go in and say like, look, what do you think we're doing? Like nobody on either side has had that opportunity to talk yet.

The first chance was in the last episode, the shipment where Archer has an opportunity to meet with a minor who is taking out. A component that is used to create that weapon. It's the first opportunity that Archer has to say, what do you have against us? And his response is like, I've never even heard of you people.

Well, yeah. The way, the way that you break out of the cycle of violence is that you have to talk that's, that's, what's required and they're, they're making. It clear in the episodes. The Archer is the one that's trying to find the path towards that to break the cycle, to make sure that this isn't just us versus them trying to wipe each other out.

It's, there's gotta be a better path. But to the specifics of this episode, um, my, my take was, I thought one of the things I really appreciated was how well it was written because this deals with. Yeah, but it's not time travel. Yeah. And they avoided that horrible mess that you typically end up in star Trek when it's like, oh, let's go back in time and like rewrite things or yeah.

You know, all that kind of stuff. It avoids that. And I thought it. Ingenious that he is infected with this, um, microbe. I can't remember. What is that? The yeah. Infection. Yeah. That is basically out of time. Yeah. It is an infection that is existing outside of space time. So when they end up figuring out how to obliterate it in the future, it erases it from all of every moment of history.

Yeah. So it's a fantastic. Conceit that they came up with and I just wanna, it is a

small, terrific authors. Yeah. It is a terrific hard sci-fi element. Yes. And what is otherwise a, a kind of, um, almost our town storytelling, like, yeah, it is a very quiet character driven story showing. As I mentioned at the beginning characters playing out the roles without the details, getting in the way you see to Paul has become captain she's giving she's given a field commission.

She leaves the Vulcan, uh, command entirely is now dawning a star fleet uniform, and is, and is captain of the enterprise and makes decisions that her crew does not agree with. You see her eventually leave captaining so that she can just take care. Archer permanently, they live on the planet. Which did you catch the, the location of the H county?

Yes. Lovely, lovely throwback there. City city alpha five. Yes. The city alpha five is where they're located. And of course we all know what's gonna happen to that. So ultimately even if the Xindi don't show up, I was like, screwed. Well, they're screwed anyway. Like it's gonna take a couple of centuries, but that planet's not gonna boat.

Uh, do anything good for them? You see her committed to him in a way that goes beyond a first officer serving a captain, it becomes a one way romantic relationship. And just one of, of like a deep companionship that has developed into love for her. Yes, where he doesn't have enough recollection from moment to moment to understand that their relationship has changed until in this episode, they have a conversation where he is pointedly saying like, what, how deep is our relationship?

What is going on here? And. The same with flocks who, when he returns with word of, I finally did it. Mm-hmm I figured out a solution here. He reveals that he has spent years now basically becoming yeah. He's he spent a decade becoming a quantum physicist. Yep. He, this is not somebody who, you know, like in his spare time.

Did things that happened to lead to this cure. He makes a statement early on in the episode, I will devote myself to figuring out a cure here and then shows up 10 years later. And basically without saying it says, yeah, I had to become a quantum engineer to determine what would actually, without it being an implosion.

What would actually get rid of these things and I figured it out and he builds a device to do that. And so, and it works. It's remarkable. It's a remarkable bit of storytelling showing characters in a way that is basically the equivalent of the Picard series now. Yep. Yeah. Like jumping forward in time and saying like, so what's been going on with these people.

How do we catch up to that?

Well, it's also, it's also interesting to show nothing that happened. Feels like it's outta character for those characters. Yeah. Nothing in this episode. And I have to applaud them. They, they stuck to the character Bible that they probably had written up. They were very true to characters and I love that they brought up the intimate relationship between to Paul and the captain that is not reciprocated, cuz he can't.

But there's definite love there. Yeah. And affection and care, or she wouldn't be doing what she did as long as she did. Yeah. And it's very true to her character. She's a loyal character on the show and this loyalty expands and they expanded upon that, which I thought was beautiful. And then for Fox, he is just a good person that wants to do the best thing he can do.

He wants to help people. Yeah. And the fact that he spent a decade and rededicated himself to figuring this. To me, it felt very true to that character. Yeah. It didn't feel like it was contrived for this episode. It felt like he would do that. Yeah. Like that's exactly what he, this kind of person, he is what he would do.

Yeah. Which ties into one of the, the plot elements of the show when they find that. Little ship. That's orbiting the sun really close mm-hmm and trip. They go over there and like, what the hell you doing here? And they get the guy and they're like, get the crap out of him saying, talk to us. Yeah. And it turns out he was sent there by somebody, obviously from the Xindi and he was, and when he said I was told to watch flock when he left.

Yeah. If he ever left the planet because they it's like the Xindi knew that Fox would be trying to help him in some fashion. And I thought that was great. A great little touch of like everybody knew. Nobody knew where the humans. But this guy does and it's like, we gotta watch him. Right. So it was like the patience of the Xindi is also interesting that they yeah.

You know, they really wanna obliterate everybody and that's the level they'll go to. It was it's I thought the storytelling was just brilliantness.

Yeah. And it has also the elements around, there are character arcs that are so subtly done, trip bristles under the decision making of de. There are elements of conflict between the two of them, where he was basically like, you just doomed us.

Through your decision making because she uses the ship that is docked, the Xindi ship that is docked with them. She uses it effectively like a club against another Xindi ship. And in the re the fall out of that is she destroys their ability to go. Higher warp speeds, which slows them down, which leads to by the time they find the location of the production of the Xindi weapon.

It's too late. The weapon has gone. It has, it has gone to earth. They then show years later, he's now captain she's left the ship and he has mellowed in ways like he has. He has now filling that role. And Reed has also been given a captaincy. So you end up with these long term. Elements for these characters that feel true to what their arcs would be.

It makes sense that Reid with the experiences he's had would be given a captaincy. If he, if there was one available, it makes sense that when. Trip is fully in charge. He would wear that mantle a little bit differently than he would being an underling where he can question his captain's choices. But then when he's the one calling the shots, it's obviously changed his perspective and he's mellowed a bit.

And the through line of all this is that Archer is the one who arguably is not supposed to have changed. And I think Bette does a great job in portraying the kind of stunned hurt of. What this would be like, the, the kind of, it's almost a story of dementia from that perspective of the sorrow that he goes through.

Yep. He realizes I'm having a conversation with you right now. That for me is the first time. And I'm realizing by the look on your face that we've done this before and the, the sorrow and mourning for himself the morning for. His opportunities that are now gone. And in those moments of lucidity where he would recognize not only is this painful in the moment, I know I won't even remember it enough to avoid this pain.

Again. I will relive this again without knowing it. And the, the pain of that. When he says to, to Paul, you don't have to say anything to me to show your gratitude for what I did, because he was injured by saving. but when he says you don't have to gimme gratitude, cuz I won't even remember it. Mm-hmm and the sadness with that's buried within that.

It's really remarkable. This, this also ties into for me the, the storytelling. For this episode is, is spot on for this crew. For these characters, it does something it's almost an identical structure to an episode from DS nine deep space. Nine had an episode in which it did deal with time travel in which it was kept Cisco.

There's an accident that takes him out of. Phase basically, and he's rubber banding back and forth through time. And the anchor point for him is his son. So he is going back and forth between his son as a young adolescent, and then snapping forward to seeing his son as an older man. And as he goes back and forth in this way, for him, time is moving by in minutes.

Yeah. But for his son, you see what Jake Cisco's development is. And Jake Cisco's entire life becomes devoted to understanding what is happening and figuring out the perfect time to snap the rubber band, which will put his father back in the right time. That is a very, very personal story between two characters.

It's powerful. It's a very powerful, powerful story. It's effective. It's very similar to this in that you're giving that longer term storytelling to, to really say, what does this mean on that? One, the scope really feels intensely personal. It almost doesn't matter what has happened in the larger scope, because what you're seeing is Jake has devoted his life to figuring out literally at what moment should I die in order to make sure my father can be saved.

This is taking that and blowing it up to a galactic scale. It is literally by Archer's removal from the captain seat. We. Humanity loses humanity is hunted. Humanity will be exterminated. That is a scale that is unimaginable. And by the time that it got to, oh, I've discovered that my device worked, but unexpectedly, it works throughout all of time.

Meaning if we can cure you, we will cure you back then. I was so invested in. Discovery that I found myself thrilled at the fact that I was watching a 40 minute story, which felt at that point, like I'd been watching it, it, it could have been hours and it would've been fine. It could have been, I could have been watching this story unfold over a much longer period of time.

And. I suddenly was like, oh my God, I've only been watching this for 30 minutes. This is remarkable. And, and when they have that final moment of, it has to be an implosion, they have to effectively destroy the enterprise to make this all happen. It of course, falls to Archer himself. He is going through the last moments of destroying the ship, making sure the engines will implode.

He dies moments before I interpreted that is he dies moments before the ship is destroyed. Yep. That he, the last thing he does is throw the final switch on the engines to make them implode. Uh, at this point, all the major everybody's dead, the, the bridge of the enterprise has been ripped out. Everybody on the bridge is dead, uh, to Paul and flock have both been killed by the, the attacking Xindi and Archer is being shot multiple times from every direction and manages to blow up the ship and then wakes.

In sick bay, where as far as everybody's concerned, nothing happened, there's no physical impact from his having gone through that wave of the anomaly. It's really kind of remarkable that we have that opportunity. The storytelling figured out a way, how do we let the viewers know that Archer is critical to the future of the Federation?

But do it in a concrete way. Yeah. Without changing what we're doing here, episode to episode, and they figured out a way to have their cake and eat it too. I just really crossed the board. I was just like, that was a great episode.

It, it, it left enough of a mark that, and it had a point that you could almost argue in episode like this.

What's the point, because at the end of the episode, everything that just happened is UN is erased. Yeah. So what was the point of that journey? Well, the point of the journey is for us as a viewer, it shows the stakes that are involved. Yeah. It drives that home. So now it's like it's raised the stakes for every episode that will follow from this one.

So there is a takeaway, there is a meaning for it and it wasn't just like a meaningless episode of a story that doesn't have any impact, cuz it, it does. It's it's it's excellent. I.

Yeah. So viewers listeners let us know. What did you think? Do you agree that this is one that really fills in that the reveals, as Matt said, reveals the stakes, even though the elements, the outcome of the actions within the story itself don't occur once the reset is taken place, do you agree that this was a critical thing for the storytelling in the series to let us know.

We have to watch out for this guy because he is that important. Let us know in the comments, you can drop into the comments directly beneath the YouTube video, or you can find the contact information in the podcast description. And if you don't wanna weigh in, if you don't have anything else to say, you can just drop into the comments and just type Archer and let us know that you support him in his need to fill out, to fulfill his, his orders.

Today's code word is Archer Archer.

So next time we're gonna be talking about the episode north star, Matt, any predictions, what will that be about?

Probably a star that's in the north. Mm.

Maybe the north star even could be who's to say I'm not gonna guess. Before we sign off Matt, is there anything you wanted to let everybody know about on your other channels?

What do you have going on at, uh, undecided? Uh,

it'll be out by the time this episode's out, but there's an interesting, uh, invention. That's about, uh, molecules, like in store solar energy for up to 18 years in a liquid, which is really cool. And then coming up in a few days after this video comes out is so

it's literally liquid.

liquid sunshine.

Uh, and then a few days from this episode coming out is one on using CO2 as a battery system for utility scale energy storage, which I just love the irony of we're trying to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. Well, we could use CO2 to create a gigantic battery, so it's, it's kind of

interesting.

Very interesting. Very sciencey. Yes. And I look forward to, I look forward to viewing those. As for me, you can check out my website, Sean farrell.com. You can find out information about my books there, or you can go directly to your bookstore. You can go to Amazon, you can go to barn and noble, wherever it is, you find your books, even your public library.

You can find stuff there and keep an eye out for more announcements regarding my new series, which will be coming out next year, which is the sinister secrets. The first book will be coming out next July. I hope you'll wanna check it out. It is family fun entertainment with pirates and robots and a kid who feels guilty about the fact that nobody likes him.

So. If you'd like to support the show, please consider reviewing us on apple, on Google, on Spotify, wherever it is that you listen. And if you'd like to more directly support us, you can go to Trek in time.show, click on the, become a supporter button and throw some coins at us. We appreciate each and every bruise.

And when you do support us that way you will immediately become a recipient of out of time, time, time , which is our spinoff show in which we talk. Anything that catches our eye. It might be more Trek. It might be Trek that's out of order, like the new series that are currently airing, it might be star wars.

It might be Marvel. It might just be anything at all. So we hope you'll enjoy that when you do listen to it, all of those ways of supporting the show, liking subscribing sharing with your friends, throwing some quarters at our heads, they all help so much. Thank you so much for listening, watching, and we'll talk to you next time.